Week 2

Integrating Curriculum and Games

1. In this week…

Week 2 starts with a review of Labyrinth, the game played in Week 1, and how the rules work. Then you will be introduced to multiplayer online games, giving special attention to Radix, a game especially useful for teaching math and science. Afterwards, we will guide you on what to look for in a game to best meet the needs of your students and curriculum learning goals. Try out some games, choose one to evaluate, and think about how a teacher might use the game in the classroom. For reading, you are provided with an article about how teachers can use digital games, simulations and social media for teaching and learning.

Using Games in the Classroom: A Labyrinth Case Study Video [ ZIP, 114 MB, 540 p ]
Using Games in the Classroom: A Labyrinth Case Study Video Slides [ PDF ]
Using Games in the Classroom: A Labyrinth Case Study Video Transcript [ DOC ]

Multiplayer Online Games for Learning Video [ ZIP, 68 MB, 540 p ]
Multiplayer Online Games for Learning Video Transcript [ DOC ]

Using Games in the Classroom Video [ ZIP, 36 MB, 540 p ]
Using Games in the Classroom Video Slides [ PDF ]
Using Games in the Classroom Video Transcript [ DOC ]

Game Review Tool [ PDF ]


2. Using Games in the Classroom: A Labyrinth Case Study

Scot Osterweil presents a classroom case study about Lure of the Labyrinth.

Transcript [ DOC ]


3. Multiplayer Online Games for Learning

Susannah Gordon-Messer talks about MMOs for learning and demos Radix (math/science game).

Transcript [ DOC ]


4. Using Games in the Classroom

Jen Groff talks about Using Games in the Classroom with the Playful Learning portal.

Transcript [ DOC ]


5. Assignment

Play

Choose a game from the Game Up portal  or from the Playful Learning portal.

  • Evaluate it using the Game Review Tool
  • Describe how you would connect the game to classroom curriculum.
  • TIPS: Decide what your most important factors are: the learning goals or content of our classroom? your price point? the platform the game can run on? It helps to go through the Game Review Tool first before looking at any games, and reflect on what you’re current constraints and needs are. Then you’ll be in a better position to tell whether a game is a good fit or not.

Read

Read “The Instructional Power of digital games, social networking, simulations and how teachers can leverage them” by Eric Klopfer, Scot Osterweil, Jennifer Groff, and Jason Haas.

  • What quote or idea from the chapter gave you new insights on how games, simulations and social networking can be used for teaching and learning?

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